All About Belonging with Artie Carden

All about belonging is a blogger guest series – you guessed it – all about belonging. I have invited other bloggers to share their stories, thoughts, opinions, and ideas to do with the theme belonging here on Kate Lili Blog. I hope this guest series showcases the variety of views on belonging, and the many ways having or not having felt a sense of belonging has affected people’s individual life experience. Each new guest post will go out on Wednesdays at 6pm so stay tuned.

I am delighted to welcome Artie Carden as my first guest blogger for this series. Artie’s blog focuses on writing content for people who feel marginalised by mainstream media. Having personal experience of this is what motivates Artie to fill the gap. An absolutely perfect first guest blogger for a series all about belonging! This post about belonging takes a look at Artie’s experience of identifying as bisexual at school and what it felt like to find a home in the end at uni. Thanks Artie for getting in touch.

Belonging

belonging

I’ve always had a lot of friends, or more like acquaintances, in different groups. I have always been able to get on with all kinds of people, but is that really belonging?

In school, I knew these kids on a superficial level; I knew enough about them to keep up conversation and I’ve always been very good at making people laugh. I couldn’t really get along with their friends though… I had one or two friends per clique, and the others always looked at me with blank stares like I was an alien specimen or they’d make fun of me.

I would have my main group I’d normally hang out with, and I would get on with more of them than other groups. Really though, they weren’t very nice to me either. They told me I was annoying and a suck up and would stare me down if a joke didn’t land well. I can’t forget about the occasional body shaming and being bullied by them for not being sexually experienced (I was 14-15 at the time…). On top of all that, I’m bisexual. I learned this term because of this friendship group and am still a proud bisexual person almost 10 years later, so I have to thank them for that. It just involved more shaming from them.

Groups of Friends

The girls of the group all identified as bisexual and looking back I don’t think they did at all. It was a fashionable and edgy thing to be (and being a group of emo kids, you gotta be pretty edgy) and it was often used to seduce boys. It just made me feel more undesirable: how were these girls kissing boys and girls, and I wasn’t really kissing anyone?

I can hear you shouting at your screen ‘why didn’t you just leave?’ Well, that’s a lot more difficult to do than say. At this point in my life I was suffering with Severe Depression, I self-harmed and attempted to take my life more than once all because I felt completely alone. I’d been alienated in every group I’d gotten close to and felt like the communal punching bag to make people feel better by taking abuse. These other people I spoke to? I couldn’t tell them any of this, and with them I got to be someone else, someone who was funny and charming and a little ridiculous but friendly and fun.

I think the only way I survived this time of my life was getting to be someone else for periods of time. I thrived on stage and people loved me, but when I’d step off set I wasn’t liked anymore. I did eventually leave this group and remained friends with a few of them for a couple of years.

belonging

Mental Health

My biggest trigger for my mental health is feeling alone, like there’s no one I can go to for support, no one who will accept me for who I am.

Belonging, to me, is finding ‘your people’. These people learn who you really are behind the bravado. I had two people during school and neither were part of this group (surprise, surprise…) one of them I still see and speak to now 12 years later. They weren’t around a whole lot, but they were there when I needed someone.

Uni Friends

I didn’t feel like I belonged anywhere until I went to university three years ago. I found my people whilst at university, my writer friends, my LGBT+ friends, my fun hilarious and brilliantly intelligent friends.

These people have seen me at my most incredible, my most vulnerable, in love, heartbroken, and they’ve seen me battle my mental health. They have listened to the ridiculous rants at 2am and have also told me when I’m in the wrong, which is super important because you know they aren’t pandering to you and they want you to thrive and better yourself!

It’s okay to struggle to find your place, we will have many places in our lives and sometimes it takes a while to find somewhere that feels like home. Hold on and take care of yourself first. If people don’t like you, then never mind. It hurts but you don’t need them. Your people will find you eventually.

~ Artie Carden

Read more of Artie’s blog at:  artiecarden.wordpress.com

Artie on Facebook: www.facebook.com/artiecarden

If you liked that, you will like this post about belonging too.

 

1 Comment

  1. 12th September 2018 / 9:44 pm

    Thank you so much for letting me be part of this! I loved writing it and look forward to reading other blogger’s guest posts for you!

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